Show menu
Shooting People
 
Search
By continuing to browse this website you are agreeing to allow us to use cookies

Popular vote vs jury vote

We made one of these short-notice-theme movies for our local festival ZFF: 72.zff.com/en/2017/2190/
Now for the popular vote it all boils down to the volume of people filmmakers can get to take action. We've been mostly nr 2 since Monday with our film. And boom, some films doubled their numbers. How would you go about seeing them and raising them with more votes within 25 hours, without a prior large entourage?
Also, as a question of quality it is not, what does the popular vote mean - to you? More potential for product placement?

  • A person who was particularly eager might use a service like Amazon Mechanical Turk...

    And because of that, the "popular" vote is pretty meaningless. Product placement is pretty redundant as it depends fully on who is in the film and the fact it's a distribured feature, rather than anything historic. Placement is pretty much limited to placement, mind, it's not free production finance so much as stuff you no longer have to pay for, so cars, breakfast cereal, clothes, booze brands, etc.

    2 months ago
  • What a great idea! ;)

    Product placement was the one plausible solution for financing in my mind. It looks like product placement has turned into something like a wedding list then? I'll have: one production insurance, one completion insurance, one paperwork fees, hot tea and warm curry a gogo for the cast and crew, and also the cast and crew themselves.

    2 months ago
    • Heh heh, it's more along the lines of stuff you see on screen - you either have to hire it, make it, or get it for free. For instance on a recent film we needed some action vehicles, and instead of hiring a bunch of nice new cars for on and off screen (ie production vehicles for ferrying cast), we got them lent to us by a car manufacturer's PR department. Instead of having to make up fake brands for a box of cornflakes, Kelloggs or whoever will send us a crate to use as props and the rest go on the craft table when we're done. In a bar scene, we might get all the bar back product placed with premium gin. Makeup we'll have placed by a manufacturer rather than pay for it as they know who is in the film and that they want the association. Clothes - instead of renting or buying a £15k dress, head of costume gets loaners from designers. None of those things come with money, usually, just stuff we'd normally pay for, for free.

      It's much harder to get raw production costs sponsored - insurance, crew, etc unless you manage to find a way to get those lines sponsored in the budget in which case full credit to you! Teabags is probably the easiest of your fun list - you get some teabags on screen and get Yorkshire Tea or whoever so send you a load of product which goes on the craft station after being on screen ;-)

      2 months ago
    • @Paddy Robinson-Griffin and have the story take place in an insurance company, or where the insurers save the day. From now on, all indie films will have to take place in an insurance company's building, with logos and all! :)

      2 months ago
  • Hola Alève,
    Just agreeing with Paddy as usual and chipping in, there are a few companies that specialize providing an assortment of consumable foods, drinks, goods etc that they have been tasked with promoting, especially new products (Paddy's mention of designer Gin) and golden perennials like Bovril, Cornflakes and Mars bars. There used to be about three companies I used often in the past providing this service for free. You just contact them, they send you lists of what they have, you peruse and then send back a wish list. Arrange a drop-off time and they send a truck full round of free stuff, you only commitment is to ensure that all the items appear visibly in shots of the finished film, never used in a negative way i.e. seeing an actor getting drunk on a branded label drink is a no no, but getting merry, no problemo! Veuve Clicquot even provide fake champagne (contains non alcoholic pop substitute for production for free. Also you can often get consumer camera's, binnoculars, lower end watches, clothes and jewelry all for free. Kays with have a list of product placement companies, sorry I haven't got one to hand or I would post their names. Go for all of them and you can make up a totally convincing supermarket, convenience store, bar etc without having to spend a penny (toilet paper included as well), feed and water the crew for free well if it isn't too large. Good luck.
    Kent Brockman my two cents

    2 months ago
    • Ray, thanks much. This is interesting to know. I will absolutely have to look into that for future shoots!

      2 months ago
  • The outcome was that we were higher (4th out of 258) in the popular vote than in the jury vote, which went either for comedy or for documentary. The winner in the popular vote was also a one-liner comedy thing. What we had was serious drama, so I guess we can be happy with the result. It leaves me wondering if the jury follows what they believe is the popular taste. I've observed that in myself when judging others' films, now that I think of it. In which case, should we have a second set of jury that explicitly aims not to have that tendency?

    2 months ago
  • 4th out of hundreds is amazing! Well done!

    I wouldn't try to second-guess a jury - even in real trials nobody can tell how they'll vote. Crash won an Oscar, and that was bloody awful, for instance.

    2 months ago
    • Thanks Paddy, you are giving some perspective. You see, we were hoping to win, so it was a disappointment.
      Well I guess you want to make the film that is right for yourself, not tailored to second-guesses anyway...

      2 months ago
  • Paddy isn't always right. Crash is a good film.

    2 months ago
    • I remember crash. It did have something of a paradigm shift approach.

      2 months ago
  • You're absolutely right that I'm not always right Alan! However I really cannot agree about Crash ;-)

    2 months ago