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What Got You Hooked On Filmmaking?

Hi SP,

We're relaunching our SP instagram channel, and want to do something a little differently. We want to use the platform to spotlight our community, but without just sharing the films you've made.

We're asking you 'What Film Got You Hooked On Filmmaking'? We want to know the stories about the film you saw that made you realise you needed to make films of your own, or the film that changed the way you make films. Let us know the film that made you pick up the camera, join a production or become an actor, and tell us why. The more interesting the story or the greater the passion, the better.

We'll post these, alongside the film's poster on our feed.

We need:
- Film Title, Year, Director
- One or two line story about the film and how you relate to it, how it inspired you to make films
- Instagram handle if you have one

A crudely mocked up example here:

imgur.com/a/zeDJr

We've made a public submission form for friends and filmmakers outside of the SP network. (Though they should join SP, of course...)

bit.ly/SPWGYHASK

Please share your stories with us. Those we've received so far have been fascinating and inspiring.

See them here >

www.instagram.com/shootingpeople/...

Matt
SP

  • Hi Matt, that imgur link seems to 404?

    2 months ago
  • Touch of Evil - Orson Wells - 1958

    Wells had an eviable touch of genius if not evil by creating images that resound and resonate. For instance I was about 20 when I first saw this and was somewhat put off by noting that it included Marlene Dietrich who I 'disliked' (I thought) mainly because she couldn't sing, she couldn't dance and she especially couldn't act. Towards the end of the fascinating Kafkaesque parable, Wells enters an office where she sits at a desk (or table) reading something or other. She slowly looked up with those astonishing eyelashes and my 20 year old stomach did a loop de loop.

    2 months ago
  • Thanks Paddy, now fixed.

    Matt
    SP

    2 months ago
  • Amélie, Jean-Pierre Jeunet, 2001

    An almost perfect blend of comedy and drama with truly beautiful production design, fantastic casting and direction, score, and a perfect sense of whimsy. I love it when a film can carry you on a journey and you can completely trust the director to deliver in every frame.

    2 months ago
  • Ruggero Deodato's Cannibal Holocaust and Terry Gilliam's Life Of Brian... In the wild west days of uncertified VHS video I was way too young to watch both these films. The family had rented them from the mom & pop video store and watched the unlikely pairing as our Sunday afternoon double bill... The former had a huge impact on me and then was promptly banned under the 1984 Video Recording Act. Consequently, seeing the video artwork of this controversial film on the local news ensured it stayed with me forever as a benchmark in horror for more reasons than just entertainment. The latter I would re-watch and re-watch until I could recite sections of dialogue. Two very different films but both key stages in my love of the medium.

    2 months ago
    • Seems like everyone (me included) saw Cannibal Holocaust when they were far too young. I saw it on late night Film4 I think, aged 12 or so... I turned out fine.

      Matt
      SP

      2 months ago
  • Matt, it is not a film that got me hooked. It is a roundhouse kick. How do we go about that?

    2 months ago
    • Hi Aleve,

      That sounds interesting... Tell me about the roundhouse kick.... and your film choice!

      Matt
      SP

      2 months ago
    • @Matt Turner
      I really don't have one film that hooked or changed me as you seek. Rather, it is a gradual, layered education, inside and outside of films, throughout the years.
      If you really need a film I can give you one, but it won't carry the meaning you seek. How about:
      Ben Hur, 1959, William Wyler. Father and I watched this for years every time we had a chance and for some reason we could never see the last scene. Either it was too long, or the last scene was deleted - something always came up. It turned into a running joke between us. Instagram handle: thealevemine
      Does this help?

      The kick I got was during a training, blocked but not securely enough for the power it had. I was looking for a challenge, probably out of some frustration about the lack of ambient action towards anything that made sense. This incident led to spine surgery. It was traumatic due to the high risk for the vocal chords: I was but a singer back then. For a couple of months in rehab I didn't talk about music at all, and read physics, philosophy and medicine books and articles, meanwhile kept taking pictures at a sick frequency. The purpose, in hindsight, must have been to learn as much as I can while alive, and document the lived. The reading led to a story idea. When I got back to myself I've been offered a music show production by Yello's frontman. That was forever delayed and I couldn't use my music because it wouldn't have been a premiere when the production would have happened. So I used the time to write the story as a book, as well as work on the pictures to have exhibitions with them. Then my building was destroyed due to gentrification. I made my first film, a Super8 music video, days before leaving the flat. I looked for another flat but as an artist I've been told my chances to get one are zero. Therefore I put my stuff in storage and went to London because the entertainment industry was more promising there than in Zurich. When the book was published, people wanted it to be a film. While aiming for music gigs and to get a music video done, I looked for a screenwriter to adapt the book. But it was too complicated, and I've been told that nobody else can adapt that book anyway, so I took screenwriting at NFTS. Meanwhile the music video turned into a feature, but that's another story.
      That's how it started.

      2 months ago
    • @Alève Mine

      That does help, thanks. Also that story is insane, makes the 'what film got you hooked' format look slightly reductive. Glad it all worked out okay.

      Matt
      SP

      2 months ago
    • @Matt Turner What is yet more insane is that two of the scientific concepts I used in the scifi book for the time machine and the local reduction of entropy eventually were subject to real-world experiments - that worked!

      2 months ago
  • Legend of the Lost starring John Wayne, cinematography by the legendary Jack Cardiff, one of two cinematographers to have a huge influence on me (the other being Dougie Slocombe). I was captivated by that film.

    2 months ago
  • Apocalypse Now , Coppola, 1979

    I saw Apocalpyse Now when I was 19. It was playing in an Art House cinema in Sydney with amazing sound. I remember being gobsmacked by the opening scene where a fan is spinning above Martin Sheen. He’s silent, sweating in his hotel room, staring up.. The fan then becomes the blazing sound of helicopter blades as it cuts into this terrifying shot of a group of choppers, rising above the scarred battlefields of Vietnam. I experienced the scene viscerally - inside my bones. In fact after I came out of the film, I felt like I’d been run over. The whole experience left me shaking and deeply troubled, but in an enraptured way too. I couldn’t believe how cinema could so viscerally and profoundly transport me somewhere else like this.

    2 months ago
  • Time Bandits, 1981, Terry Gilliam
    - A young boy joins an inept band of time-travelling thieves in this incredibly inventive early feature from Gilliam. It's the rough feel of this that inspired me as a kid- Gilliam and co ran out of money at the end of production, and a number of effects were cobbled together by the editor and him in post. What could have been a detraction ends up underlining the film's spirit of creativity.
    - I'm @Willwebbful on Insta!

    2 months ago
  • Hi SP,

    The first 3 of these are live on our Instagram, with more to follow.

    www.instagram.com/shootingpeople/...

    Keep 'em coming.

    Matt
    SP

    2 months ago
  • Ha! I like Amelie's eyes on the rollover!

    2 months ago
  • These have been flowing in.

    See all the stories we've shared here. Share yours. Keep 'em coming!

    www.instagram.com/shootingpeople/...

    1 month ago
  • Love the trainspotting one.. So true on Born Slippy...

    1 month ago